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    September 2016
    SaSuMoTuWeThFr
    0102
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    10111213141516
    17181920212223
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Our Tractor Trailer Ride and the Reptile House Is Closed.

Small Mammals

Egyptian Fruit Bat

They form the largest colonies of any fruit bats, with colonies often numbering up to several thousand individuals, or even up to 50,000 in some cases.

Bats crowd close together in the roost, chattering noisily, and fights often break out. The Egyptian fruit bat typically has two breeding cycles each year, although most females breed in only one, the timing depending on the location. During the breeding season, females form nursery colonies with the young, while males tend to form separate groups. The female Egyptian fruit bat gives birth to a single young, or occasionally twins, after a gestation period of around four months. Egyptian fruit bats nest in trees as well as caves.

DID YOU KNOW? Fruit bats are believed to be the most vocal of all bat species.

Current Status

  • Least Concern
  • Near Threatened
  • Vulnerable
  • Endangered
  • Critically Endangered
  • Extinct in the Wild
  • Extinct

Key Facts

Variety of soft fruits as well as flowers, pollen and some leaves
Pteropodidae
15 years wild
25 years captivity
Least Concern
Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, the Mediterranean, Arabian Peninsula and Middle East and into southwest Asia.
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